Archives for Andrew Prentice

This is the first in a series of blogs on Atlassian QA. We will cover how the QA strategy has been implemented in different teams, the tools and techniques we use, and the personal experiences from members of the team. True, it's an assumption – but probably a safe one – that the majority of professional software testers can't code. This seems to be the cause of perennial hand-wringing by some testers who feel the need to justify their lack of technical skills, and frustrated developers who

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This guest blog post is part of an Atlassian blog series raising awareness about testing innovation within the QA community. You can find the other posts in this series under the QA Innovation tag. Previously, I explained how Bonfire (or Excalibur as it was then known) became an internal tool at Atlassian. In Part II I'll explain how it became a commercial product. Staying low Lean startup advocates push the idea of minimum viable features and failing fast. Their idea is to get your product

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Making Bonfire, Part I

This guest blog post is part of an Atlassian blog series raising awareness about testing innovation within the QA community. You can find the other posts in this series under the QA Innovation tag. At the Atlassian Summit in June this year we announced Bonfire, a tool for rapid bug reporting and session-based testing. In the five months since then we've sold over two thousand Bonfire licences, but had it not been for the generous support of my colleagues and my now three year old son, Bonfire

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Testing’s In Session

  At Atlassian, we use test sessions to manually test our products. If you're a tester and haven't heard of test sessions before, you might be surprised to learn that you're probably using them too. That's because test sessions aren't new. They're simply the periods of time, usually an hour or two, sometimes more, devoted to fulfilling specific test objectives. Executing a set of tests with the objective of proving that some piece of functionality works correctly or spending an hour bug

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Test teams don't usually choose their organisations software development methodology. Hopefully the irony of being in such a situation is not lost on any teams that call themselves "Quality Assurance". Still this doesn't prevent test managers and test teams from adopting practices outside of the decreed methodology to their advantage.

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Sharks and the art of testing

At Atlassian we develop software using agile techniques so it's unsurprising that our work is infected with tests, but testing is not limited to just our work. Let's party! Recently I organised a bucks (bachelor/stag) party for my brother. As you do, we went swimming with Great White sharks. (After all making a lifelong commitment isn't so scary once you've looked death in the face). Hence nine of us travelled from Sydney to Neptune Island off the South Australian coast. There a large seal colony

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