Archives for Jonathon Creenaune

This post was featured in Dr. Dobb’s as part of a series focusing on enterprise teams making the switch to Git. In this three part blog series we focus on migrating the JIRA code base from Subversion to Git. We wanted to share our migrating experience to those of you who are contemplating moving a large project to Git - without sacrificing active development. In our first post we discuss why we decided to make the switch to Git. In our second post we dive in the technical details of switching

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Featured on Dr. Dobb's, this is the second blog in a three part series about making the switch to Git in the enterprise. In the first post, we discussed why so many teams today have decided to make the switch. This post focuses on the technical aspects of how Atlassian actually made the switch to Git. In this three part blog series I will focus on the biggest migration Atlassian has done – migrating the 11-year-old JIRA codebase from SVN to Git. What obstacles did we encounter? What lessons did

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This post was featured in Dr. Dobb's as part of a series focusing on enterprise teams making the switch to Git. At Atlassian, we have been extremely excited about DVCS for a number of years. We have invested heavily in DVCS. We acquired Bitbucket - a cloud DVCS repository host. We developed Stash - a behind the firewall Git repository manager. We added DVCS support to FishEye, our code browsing and search tool. And we added a myriad of DVCS connectors to JIRA, our issue tracker. We believe DVCS

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Add some strength to your Backbone

In JIRA we've been getting pretty excited about Backbone.js. There are a lot of things we love, too numerous to mention here. But there are a couple of things I want that Backbone doesn't give us. First, a backbone model might look like this: [cc lang='javascript' line_numbers='false'] var model = new Backbone.Model(); [/cc] That's it. What attributes does it expose? Does it have any custom events? I probably don't know because there are 8 people on my team, so it's about a 12.5% probability

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