Within our support system, we face quite a few tasks that could be made easier with some kind of automation/scripting layer. Just to mention some examples: Imagine we do not receive a comment on an support ticket for more than 14 days. Can we close the issue? Does our customer need any further help? After we suggest a resolution, we often are interested about the quality of our service, so we invite customers to a survey to help us understand and improve our support in general. Finally, if a customers

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Last week, we held a webinar called Feature development lifecycle with Git. This time, we took a different approach in order to give attendees the feeling that they were watching an experienced developer run through a coding session in real time. If you tuned into this session, you had the chance to peek over my shoulder while I worked through a simple bug-fix end-to-end, from branch creation, through code review, to the final merge. I think we can safely call this session a success,

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This post is part of a series of blogs on Atlassian QA. We will cover how the QA strategy has been implemented in different teams, the tools and techniques we use, and the personal experiences from members of the team. Goliath online After arriving at the office, you stop by the kitchen to grab your morning cereal and head to your desk. You settle down and begin responding to customer emails regarding bugs under investigation. After standup, you join up with your team lead and PM to triage bugs

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Before joining Atlassian, I'd been working on various projects that still used Subversion (SVN) as their version control system. I had moved to Git already years before, and I wanted to keep using it as much as possible. Luckily I could use git-svn: An incredibly complete solution to interact with Subversion repositories without leaving the comfort of the Git power toolset. But there are gotchas. This post assumes you are already a little bit acquainted with git-svn, and you know how to interact

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Inside Atlassian – The JIRA QA process

This post is part of a series of blogs on Atlassian QA. We will cover how the QA strategy has been implemented in different teams, the tools and techniques we use, and the personal experiences from members of the team. The JIRA engineering team is large, consisting of 78 developers and team leads, 10 product managers, six UI designers, and three technical writers. To assist this vast crowd with quality, we have a team of only six QA engineers. In Introducing Atlassian QA, we described the overall

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Automate your standup and wallboard with Crontabs

On the Atlassian Marketplace team, we have a daily standup at 10:30 a.m Pacific. With one permanently remote team member, we were having to manually start a Google Hangout on the wallboard every morning. To make matters worse, our standup music was played by a small app which pulled the wallboard out of fullscreen mode. I took it upon myself to automate the wallboard and standup hangout completely within the browser, so in my spare time I wrote Crontabs. Crontabs is a simple Chrome extension

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