By using Atlassian JIRA (Core or Software) every day, I became crazy about wanting to "jiralyse" everything. As the product moves to being less and less linked to IT software development, it’s becoming easier and easier to use JIRA not only for workflows and customer relationships but also for data analysis. Check out how I built a JIRA-based carp catches inventory system!

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If your project in JIRA Software is your one-stop shop for everything JIRA-related, then your project space in Confluence is your go-to place for everything else: requirements, retrospectives, meeting notes, and more. Here are 3 ways to use the project space to surface what's most important to you.

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Marketing can be a cyclical process. We marketers typically plan projects, assign work, review content, publish, and then.... start all over again. At the beginning of each quarter we approach this process with bright-eyed enthusiasm, big ideas, and a clear plan of attack. But as the months wear on, and more (or unexpected) work accumulates, it can be tough to keep the process together. That said, having the correct tools in place can alleviate the manual labor of staying organized and can sustain

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In a DevOps world, work is often merged to master multiple times a day, but it’s not always easy to know when changes ship. Developers have full control over deploying their changes to customers which makes it extra important that those changes are tracked. The good news is that teams can automate much of this process using JIRA Software or JIRA Service Desk. Here are six actionable steps for better release management in the JIRA platform.

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Agile software development supports a release plan, but it's challenging to coordinate that on a multi-team level when you've got a lot of dependencies between teams. Rosetta Stone, a language learning technology company, found a solution to this challenge by bringing their entire development organization together about once per quarter to map out 10 to 12 weeks of work. And last week, I was lucky enough to watch how they do this at their 5th program increment planning (dubbed "PI5"). Here's how it worked.

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