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Testing the software and applications that we make is one of the most important things we can do as technology makers. In our hyper-connected and "always on" world, if you don't find the bugs in your product, your customer will – and they'll probably tweet about it. Here's how you can improve your testing methods with some help from some add-ons available in the Atlassian Marketplace.

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At Atlassian we love using emoticons in our daily chats and conversations, so we conducted a study of how they are used in the workplace to see if anyone else feels the way we do. And the results show that people not only use emoticons and emojis in their workplace communications, but they also feel that using them positively influences the way they work with their teams.

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Enterprise chat: 8 reasons why your engineering team will love it

With engineering teams becoming more distributed, it's important that they remain in constant communication to ship better-quality products, faster. Email and traditional meetings present many challenges for these teams. An enterprise chat tool helps teams stay up to date on what happened overnight and what needs to get done each day.

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An agile design prototype is worth a thousand user stories

Once you build prototypes into your design process, you get a better feel for whether you are solving problems in the right way for your customers. You will also find it invites more constructive feedback from customers and internal teams, as it feels more real than a static mockup ever can. Taking the agile design prototype approach and refining the prototype multiple times allows your team to find better, more elegant solutions, faster.

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Thanks to the rise of distributed version control (DVCS), like Git, the peer feedback process has vastly improved. Git's ability to branch and merge easily has made it possible to review smaller sets of changes more often. This type of code review is based on a concept known as pull requests. Pull requests provide a forum to discuss proposed changes to your codebase before they're merged into shared branches (e.g. before merging a feature branch into master).

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