Archives for the tag: dev tools

This guest post comes courtesy of Carolyn Van Slyck, a full-stack software developer and a newly converted champion for Git. Carolyn has recently spearheaded her team's source code migration from SVN to Git with the help of Stash and subgit. She will be sharing her learnings and wisdom with us today. Redefining what is possible I work at a large software company which is heavily invested in Subversion. In my division alone, we have 3 repositories, each with 100+ projects. I don't even know how

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On the Stash team, we are focused on building high-quality software. From mandatory code reviews to continuous performance testing to automated test suites, we take pride in ensuring that every release of Stash (14 in the past year and half) is the best product built in the best way. Why? We want to continuously improve the experience you – our customers – have with the product. Just as you would improve code quality by refactoring, for Stash 2.10 we wanted to focus on enhancing the existing

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I've been writing a lot of documentation lately. On the Stash team we keep the bulk of our developer documentation in the Stash git repository, right alongside our production code. This approach means that as we introduce new plugin points, developers can review and critique the documentation for those plugin points in the same pull request as the code change. This has proved a convenient feedback mechanism and has made keeping our developer documentation up-to-date much easier. We use markdown syntax

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Have you ever had the desire to add new features or customize Atlassian products?  Well, you can do just that by building your own Atlassian plugin.  We provide the plugin framework and an SDK to make this possible.  If you want to learn more, you’re invited to attend the plugin courses we’re offering on Sept 19th just south of San Francisco in Half Moon Bay. We're offering three classes for Java developers: Getting Started with Atlassian Plugins, Intermediate JIRA Plugin Development, and

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As a developer, it's very rewarding to work with beautiful APIs that just work. Half the battle of building applications against 3rd party APIs is having clear and concise documentation that show great examples. However, sometimes documentation doesn't go far enough. Sometimes, having a tool that allows you to "touch and feel" the API is more productive. Having the ability to play with an API allows for greater discovery and can sometimes lead to better use. At AtlasCamp in September, we demonstrated

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tl;dr 6 months after the move to Mercurial and testing different working modes using this DVCS, the GreenHopper team ended up using following Mercurial features: We use clones for "throw away" spikes as well as in case where other teams want to contribute code changes to the GreenHopper code base Each feature is developed in a separate branch inside the main repository. Once complete, the changes are merged back to default and the branch closed Our main repository is hosted on Bitbucket,

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