Archives for the tag: fork

You've probably heard about the awesome workflow capabilities that Git can offer you. But you may be asking yourself, "How can a version control system that just stores my code history really be that helpful?" The answer is all in the workflows. For many teams, some of the most pressing development questions can be addressed with a proper workflow: Are all the features completed for the next release? Are we missing any commits? Has everybody reviewed the new code? Does every team member know

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One question that every team faces when moving to Git is what development workflow to use. Since every team is different and has different requirements, there is no one-workflow-fits-all approach. However, there is one rule all teams should follow when looking for a new workflow to adopt: Keep it simple. Doing so will reduce the number of mistakes people can make, and will help with adoption. On the Stash team, we've adopted one of the simplest Git workflows possible. And since so many of you

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In Stash 2.4 we introduced support for fork-based workflows. As part of building the feature, half the Stash team switched to forks for their daily work to dogfood forks and ensure it worked. The result? Pain. Let me explain. The pain grew out of two primary shortcomings of forking: Integrating with upstream is clunky and onerous because you have to maintain 2 remotes and constantly juggle them Verifying what you've written is impossible, because continuous integration (CI) does not understand

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Stash 2.6: Fork synchronization, audit logs and repository quick-search

Developers are always seeking "the flow" because they know interruptions are focus killers. Most developers we know want to come into work and build cool stuff with clean code. What don't they want to spend time on? Manually synchronizing a forked repository, or playing tug-of-war with IT over permissions to access server logs. Getting side-tracked with things like this means less time coding, and less time coding means frustrated developers. One way to reduce interruptions is to automate repetitive

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Stash 2.4: Forking in the Enterprise

Interested in the latest Stash release? Check out What’s New » The distributed nature of Git gives development teams a plethora of options when choosing how to collaborate on projects. Teams migrating their development to Git need the flexibility to best work with code in a distributed enterprise environment. Common practices have emerged using branch- and fork- based workflows, igniting debates on how they can best be used in the enterprise. Today we're pleased to announce Stash 2.4,

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Enterprise DVCS Workflows are settling and patterns are consolidating. The flexibility git gives teams is so broad that even within a single company different teams might use different approaches to code sharing and collaboration. I speak from hard evidence as this is exactly what happens at Atlassian. The Stash team works differently than the Confluence team which works differently from the JIRA team. They all share a similar Agile process but have different approaches to branching, Continuous

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